The Appropriate Use of Assistive Technology for Students – Antonia Guccione, MA, MS [Guest Blog Post]

Discerning how, when, and why students should access Assistive Technology to support learning involves many levels of decision making.  It all starts with the IEP, the student’s present levels of performance, his educational needs, and the impact those needs have on learning. Thank goodness there is help! The Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative provides a series of tools for educators and parents. The WATI Assistive Technology Consideration Guide is a great place to start if you suspect that there are tools that are necessary to support a student’s learning.

For example, if a student has an issue with writing, it can seriously impact that student’s ability to function in the classroom and do grade level work. For our purposes, we will assume an upper elementary age male child and begin our assessment and decision making there.  He may not be able to express thoughts, opinions, or ideas on paper.  How will he form complete sentences and/or organized paragraphs?  How can Assistive Technology help him?

Discerning how, when, and why students should access Assistive Technology to support learning involves many levels of decision making.  It all starts with the IEP, the student’s present levels of performance, his educational needs, and the impact those needs have on learning. Thank goodness there is help! The Wisconsin Assistive Technology Initiative provides a series of tools for educators and parents. The WATI Assistive Technology Consideration Guide is a great place to start if you suspect that there are tools that are necessary to support a student’s learning.

http://www.wati.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/WATI-Assessment.pdf [PDF file]

THE WATI

Enter the WATI Assistive Technology Consideration Guide. First, the team must agree on the impact of this issue.  While many are possible, let’s assume that the major impact for this student is his ability to do grade level work in the classroom and express his thoughts on paper in an organized paragraph.  The question becomes whether there is currently assistive technology- either devices, tools, hardware, or software that might help address this need?

Referring to the Assistive Technology Continuum, there are Low Tech, Mid Tech, and High-Tech tools to consider. Have any been tried?  Is there data to support the trials?  Possible Low-Tech tools include specialized pens, raised paper, highlighters, post -its, and slanted surfaces. Mid Tech Tools include tape recorders, spell checkers and dictionaries.  High Tech tools include word prediction software, word banks, and word processors.

Finally, would the use of these assistive technology tools support the student in performing this skill more easily in the least restrictive environment? If the answer is yes, it is time to consult with the IEP team and document this need, its impact, and interventions that might be helpful.

https://adayinourshoes.co m/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/WATI-Assessing-Students-Needs-for-Assistive-Technology.pdf [PDF file]

Based on lack of progress on IEP goals, the Committee on Special Education must consider a student’s need for assistive technology devices and/or services, as well as possible modifications and accommodations.  If a student needs such devices and/or services, the appropriate sections of the IEP must specify the:

  • nature of the assistive technology to be provided; 
  • services the student needs to use the assistive technology device; 
  • frequency, and duration of such services; 
  • location where the assistive technology devices and/or services will be provided; and 
  • whether such a device is required to be used in the student’s home or another setting in order for the student to receive a free appropriate public education.

http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/publications/iepguidance/present.htm

GOALS

Goals must be written accordingly, and I recommend using the concept of a SMART Goal.  A specific goal which is measurable, attainable, realistic, and timely has a greater chance of being accomplished than a general goal.

https://east.madison.k12.wi.us/files/east/Smart%20Goals%20Information%20CC%2011_0.pdf [PDF file]

Here is an example of an objective taken directly from an AT-Resource Guide for written communication which utilizes Assistive Technology:

Goal: Jon will use an electronic graphic organizer to write an opening topic, a closing, and three supporting detail sentences to construct a five-sentence paragraph, by the end of the first semester.

Objective: Given five sentences in an electronic graphic organizer, Jon will identify and arrange the opening topic, the closing, and three supporting detail sentences to create a paragraph, by the end of the first six weeks of school.

https://www.ocali.org/up_doc/AT_Resource_Guide_6.pdf [PDF file]

IN THE IEP

Another resource which offers support to parents in understanding what Assistive Technology is and how to get it into a student’s IEP is noted below:

https://adayinourshoes.com/assistive-technology/

Once the tools have been obtained, how does one manage the Assistive Technology?  Who trains the teachers and parents? Who trains the student?  But that is a whole other discussion!

Even if the present levels of performance indicate a student who can participate in a discussion, that doesn’t mean he can write about it. A basic understanding of texts and current events is not the issue. However, ask him to summarize that information in a paragraph and the sky falls down.  On the IEP, present levels of performance are recorded, and appropriate sources of data have been discussed and administered.  These have included both formal and informal assessments, with work samples, and data charts to show progress or lack of progress over time. Are there modifications and accommodations that have been incorporated? Have these interventions resulted in significant progress or is this student still having difficulty responding to a writing prompt.

FINAL NOTES

In conclusion, Assistive Technology provides many tools to support learning and can result in a positive outcome.  It is a timely process, but one worth pursuing. Better to know what works sooner rather than later.  Assess the student’s needs, document the impact on learning, and then choose the appropriate tool to support learning in the least restrictive environment.  Keep accurate data to demonstrate progress.

If you suspect your child could benefit from assistive technology, reach out to the professionals involved in his education.  In addition, access the sites documented in this article.  I’ve only presented one need, and that is for writing. I haven’t even touched on communication, mobility, motor aspects of writing, reading, learning and studying, math, recreation, or activities of daily living, vision, hearing, and language processing. Understand that the array of Assistive Technology Tools is vast.  Following a process to obtain these tools may be involved, but it can result in access to tools that can help this child for life. 


Antonia Guccione, MA; MS

Antonia is a consultant, educator, and author with over forty years’ experience working with students of all ages, strengths, and needs.

Which Teaching Style is “Best”? – Antonia Guccione, MA, MS [Guest Blog Post]

In the districts in which I taught as a Special Educator as well as in the districts where my own children attended school, parents would always advocate for certain teachers; “the good ones” —the ones whom everyone respected and the ones who always got good results.  It’s hard to say whether there is a correlation between a student’s learning style and certain teachers. Is there one type of teacher that does well with all students?  Probably not, but if you are in the business of trying to find the best “fit” for your child, there are some things to consider.

Teacher’s Individual Style

First think about the teacher’s individual style. In the book Classroom Discipline and Management, Clifford Edwards discusses three primary teaching styles. Everyone would like to be or have the Democratic Teacher.  Children develop a sense of belonging and have a stake in the classroom. Firm guidance is being provided with each step and children are involved in making decisions.  In addition, children are taking responsibility for their own work and are involved in cooperative learning experiences where each can explore, discover, and choose his or her own way.  All the while, the teacher is firm, yet kind. This is the ideal. The results are positive; children develop a sense of belonging and have a stake in the classroom.

However, there are teachers who favor more of an autocratic style.  They tend to force their will on students rather than motivate them.  There may be little warmth or humor in interactions and these teachers refuse to tolerate any deviation from rules.  In the worst case, they exact punishment for those who refuse to conform.  Is it necessary sometimes to be firm?  Of course.  Are there consequences for improper behavior? Yes, definitely. Teachers must use their judgement as each situation differs. However, a daily diet of this autocratic style may result in students who are hostile to demands, commands, and reprimands. 

Then there are teachers who are too permissive and promote a classroom atmosphere which is chaotic and not conducive to either teaching or learning. They underestimate the importance of rules and do not follow through on consequences.   Sometimes a child needs some room or a special set of circumstances.  Again, teachers must use their judgment.  On an ongoing basis though, students may feel empowered to challenge rules and expectations at every turn.

The Child’s Individual Learning Style

When thinking about the best fit for your child, another variable to consider is his or her individual learning style.  You, as parents, know your child best. By the time children have completed third grade you are probably familiar with their style, be it visual, auditory, kinesthetic, or geared to reading and writing.   You know what kinds of assignments appeal to them and which ones are problematic. 

https://teach.com/what/teachers-know/learning-styles/ .

In addition, the theory of multiple intelligences can often be helpful in understanding the needs of your child. There are seven basic styles.  Which does your child favor?

  • Linguistic intelligence (“word smart”)
  • Logical-mathematical intelligence (“number/reasoning smart”)
  • Spatial intelligence (“picture smart”)
  • Bodily-Kinesthetic intelligence (“body smart”)
  • Musical intelligence (“music smart”)
  • Interpersonal intelligence (“people smart”)
  • Intrapersonal intelligence (“self-smart”)
  • Naturalist intelligence (“nature smart”)

Teaching Environment

Classroom management is a topic onto itself. Behavior does not happen in a vacuum. Many a student has been coaxed into learning by an engaging lesson which peaks his or her curiosity. Teachers need to excel at their craft.  According to James Stronge, effective teachers excel in the following: 

  • Professional knowledge.
  • Instructional planning.
  • Instructional delivery.
  • Assessment
  • Learning environment.
  • Professionalism.

It is a teacher’s primary responsibility to devise engaging lessons in line with standards and assessments as well as a student’s learning style.

In the end, I think good teachers will devise a combination of the three basic types that are in the literature.  While the ideal may be the democratic teacher, sometimes a more permissive attitude is needed; other times some firmness is required. 

Action Items

If you find that your child is thriving, reach out and thank that teacher! However, if you find that your child is developing coping behaviors in school which are not to your liking, dig below the surface and investigate the teaching style, the classroom atmosphere, and the curriculum and assignments being presented.  Think about your child’s type of intelligence and learning style. Consult with the professionals to engage their help if necessary. Somewhere in there is a solution to promote an atmosphere conducive to teaching and learning and a happy and engaged child. 

Edwards, Clifford H,  Classroom Discipline and Management,.  John Wiley & Sons, Hoboken, N.J.  2000.

Stronge, James H, Qualities of Effective Teachers,  Alexandria, Va., ASCD, 2002.